What is the Future of In-Car Downloads?

What is the Future of In-Car Downloads?

January 25, 2016 Written by Mark
What is the Future of In-Car Downloads?
Direct downloads to cars are a promising development of the future of technology.
 
Direct digital downloads are only a small step away from technology as it is now. At the moment it is possible to download sat-nav updates to a car via satellite, however, there is a new wave of technology on the horizon. This technology allows for digital downloads to go directly to the sat-nav, stereo, or other aspects of the car dashboard.
 

What Does The Technology of In-Car Downloads Mean?


This technology allows for two things, the first of which is fairly obvious. The ability to download directly to a car input allows media to be revolutionised within the car. Rather than plugging technology in, the car can have its own media library of both music and films (for the back seats) playing directly from in-car memory.
 
This will change the car interface forever, having a technology-based experience that moves with the times as opposed to having to rely on CDs. CDs are a medium that no one has realistically used for years. The whole world has moved on but for some reason the automotive industry has not. Hopefully direct-to-car downloads can change that.
 
The second thing this technology brings is the opportunity for instant updates of in-car software, something we think will come to the market within the next year or two.
 
What few people realise is that the technology is already there for self-driving cars. Several cars can park themselves, and cruise control has been around for years. What this means is that the hardware is there, already installed within the car, however it is not being utilised to its fullest potential…yet.
 
Picture this though – cars receiving software updates directly as and when more technology becomes available. This means it is possible that the technology that is already in cars could be used to help them evolve into self-driving cars.
 
Following this logic, the self-driving revolution would not so much be an instant switch between one form of technology to another but rather it would be a slow transition. Software could simply be updated via a network link to create a far smoother transition between the two radically different forms of technology. It could happen without us even knowing.
 
Rather than the Google car being the first self-drive car, the possibility of additional software to bolster existing cars to the point of self-drive is far stronger. Software could, for one example, be used to drive a car on a motorway or slowly around country lanes. The only limitation would be the effective range of the sensors on the front and back of the car. Sort these out though and the transition could be faultless.
 
The greater meaning to this is that enabling downloads directly to the car is a skeletal key to many different revolutions – both entertainment wise and in regards to enabling different software to be used with pre-existing in-car software. Controlling how a car works is just part one of what could potentially mean so much more for the future of the automotive industry. 

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